9.19.2010

flannel cakes

Brunch

Flannel Cakes. Hmm. Are they a pancake or a crepe or what? Has more than nine-tenth of the population never heard of these? I haven't. Until I came across a recipe for it and then I went in search. It was difficult for me to find information about this elusive cake; most people just liken them to pancakes, but in fact, as far as I know those facts, Flannel Cakes are lighter, fluffier and thinner than than traditional pancakes. They are supposed to be less dense than their counter-part and therefore less filling.

Now to find a recipe...most call for at least 4 eggs. Now normally I wouldn't even bat an eyelash - just skip 'em! No need for eggs in pancakes. But this made me think. If the cake is to be lighter, sort of halfway between a pancake and a crepe, than I couldn't just ignore the them. I had to replace them with something more than flour.

There is a recipe for Flannel Cakes in Flavors of the Southwest by Robert Oser, but it seemed too dense. BUT, he did use whole wheat bread soaked in milk as an ingredient. It was obvious to me that this would work, at least partly, so I used it for part of the recipe. The rest is flax seed meal and whole wheat flour.

The kids really loved it! It is important to cook these on low heat so they develop a nice crunch and cook all the way through without burning on the outside.

I served them with apples and maple syrup, to stay in the Auterr season.

Cost Breakdown:
whole wheat flour: $1
bread: $.50
almond milk: $1
flax: $.50
maple syrup: $.75
apples: $1
Total to feed 3 hungry kids:
$4.75




5 comments:

  1. Oh, goodness! These look and sound delicious! I'll be back for that recipe, for sure!

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  2. I certainly hadn't heard of them until now. What a discovery you made! Nice addition with the apples.

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  3. these look delicious. great with the fresh appkes! thanks for sharing.

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  4. Lovely...these look absolutely delicious. Thanks for posting the recipe- Im really looking forward to giving them a try.

    Cheers.

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  5. Thank you everyone! I had never heard of them before either, and the recipe is certainly unusual (unless you are Hungarian, who have bread soaked in milk for breakfast. Then it totally makes sense :)

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